Instituto Nacional del Cáncer


Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del tratamiento del cáncer de hígado infantil.

Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del tratamiento del cáncer de hígado infantil.

Tratamiento del cáncer de hígado infantil

Hepatoblastoma

Hepatoblastoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the liver. It is the most common type of childhood liver cancer and usually affects children younger than 3 years of age.

The liver is one of the largest organs in the body. It has two lobes and fills the upper right side of the abdomen inside the rib cage. Three of the many important functions of the liver are the following:

  • to make bile to help digest fats from food
  • to store glycogen (sugar), which the body uses for energy
  • to filter harmful substances from the blood so they can be passed from the body in stools and urine

In hepatoblastoma, the histology (how the cancer cells look under a microscope) affects the way the cancer is treated. The histology for hepatoblastoma may be one of the following:

Signs and symptoms of hepatoblastoma

Signs and symptoms are more common after the tumor gets big. Other conditions can cause the same signs and symptoms. Check with your child’s doctor if your child has any of the following:

  • a lump in the abdomen that may be painful
  • swelling in the abdomen
  • weight loss for no known reason
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting

Causes and risk factors for hepatoblastoma

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Not every child with one or more of these risk factors will develop hepatoblastoma, and hepatoblastoma will develop in some children who don’t have any known risk factors. Talk with your child’s doctor if you think your child may be at risk.

The following syndromes or conditions are risk factors for hepatoblastoma:

Children at risk of developing hepatoblastoma may have tests done to check for cancer before any symptoms appear. Every 3 months until the child is 4 years old, an abdominal ultrasound exam is done and the level of alpha-fetoprotein in the blood is checked.

Diagnosis of hepatoblastoma

Tests that examine the liver and the blood are used to diagnose hepatoblastoma and find out whether the cancer has spread.

The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and health history: A physical exam of the body will be done to check a person’s health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient's health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Serum tumor marker test: This blood test measures the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs, tissues, or tumor cells in the body. Certain substances are linked to specific types of cancer when found in increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers. The blood of children who have liver cancer may have increased amounts of a hormone called beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) or a protein called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Other cancers, benign liver tumors, and certain noncancer conditions, including cirrhosis and hepatitis, can also increase AFP levels.
  • Complete blood count (CBC): A sample of blood is drawn and checked for the following:
  • Liver function tests: These blood tests measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by the liver. A higher-than-normal amount of a substance can be a sign of liver damage or cancer.
  • Blood chemistry studies: These blood tests measure the amounts of certain substances, such as bilirubin or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. An unusual (higher or lower than normal) amount of a substance can be a sign of disease.
  • Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) test: This blood test checks for antibodies to the EBV and DNA markers of the EBV. These are found in the blood of patients who have been infected with EBV.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium: This procedure uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the liver. A substance called gadolinium is injected into a vein. The gadolinium collects around the cancer cells so they show up brighter in the picture.

  • CT scan (CAT scan): This procedure uses a computer linked to an x-ray machine to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. In childhood liver cancer, a CT scan of the chest and abdomen is usually done.

  • Ultrasound exam: This procedure uses high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) that are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. In childhood liver cancer, an ultrasound exam of the abdomen to check the large blood vessels is usually done.

  • Abdominal x-ray: An x-ray of the organs in the abdomen may be done. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • Biopsy: During a biopsy, a doctor removes a sample of cells or tissue. A pathologist then views the cells or tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells and find out the type of cancer. The doctor may remove as much tumor as safely possible during the same biopsy procedure.

    The following test may be done on the sample of tissue that is removed:

    • Immunohistochemistry: This laboratory test uses antibodies to check for certain antigens (markers) in a sample of a patient’s tissue. The antibodies are usually linked to an enzyme or a fluorescent dye. After the antibodies bind to a specific antigen in the tissue sample, the enzyme or dye is activated, and the antigen can then be seen under a microscope. This type of test is used to check for a certain genemutation, to help diagnose cancer, and to help tell one type of cancer from another type of cancer.

Prognostic factors for hepatoblastoma

The prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options for hepatoblastoma depend on the following:

  • the PRETEXT group
  • the size of the tumor
  • whether the type of hepatoblastoma is well-differentiated fetal (pure fetal) or small cell undifferentiated histology
  • whether the cancer has spread to other places in the body, such as the diaphragm, lungs, or certain large blood vessels
  • whether there is more than one tumor in the liver
  • whether the outer covering around the tumor has broken open
  • how the cancer responds to chemotherapy
  • whether the cancer can be removed completely by surgery
  • whether the patient can have a liver transplant
  • whether the AFP blood levels go down after treatment
  • the age of the child
  • whether the cancer has just been diagnosed or has recurred

For hepatoblastoma that recurs (comes back) after initial treatment, the prognosis and treatment options depend on the following:

  • where in the body the tumor recurred
  • the type of treatment used to treat the initial cancer

Hepatoblastoma may be cured if the tumor is small and can be completely removed by surgery.

Stages of hepatoblastoma

After hepatoblastoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the liver or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the liver, to nearby tissues or organs, or to other parts of the body is called staging. In hepatoblastoma, the PRETEXT and POSTTEXT groups are used instead of stage to plan treatment. The results of the tests and procedures done to detect, diagnose, and find out whether the cancer has spread are used to determine the PRETEXT and POSTTEXT groups.

Two grouping systems are used for hepatoblastoma to decide whether the tumor can be removed by surgery:

  • The PRETEXT group describes the tumor before the patient has any treatment.
  • The POSTTEXT group describes the tumor after the patient has had treatment such as neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

The liver is divided into four sections. The PRETEXT and POSTTEXT groups depend on which sections of the liver have cancer. There are four PRETEXT and POSTTEXT groups.

PRETEXT and POSTTEXT group I

In group I, the cancer is found in one section of the liver. Three sections of the liver that are next to each other do not have cancer in them.

PRETEXT and POSTTEXT group II

In group II, cancer is found in one or two sections of the liver. Two sections of the liver that are next to each other do not have cancer in them.

PRETEXT and POSTTEXT group III

In group III, one of the following is true:

  • Cancer is found in three sections of the liver and one section does not have cancer.
  • Cancer is found in two sections of the liver and two sections that are not next to each other do not have cancer in them.

PRETEXT and POSTTEXT group IV

In group IV, cancer is found in all four sections of the liver.

Sometimes hepatoblastoma continues to grow or comes back after treatment.

Progressive disease is cancer that continues to grow, spread, or worsen. Progressive disease may be a sign that the cancer has become refractory to treatment.

Recurrent hepatoblastoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the liver or in other parts of the body. To learn more about metastatic cancer (cancer that has spread from where it started to other parts of the body), see Metastatic Cancer: When Cancer Spreads.

Types of treatment for hepatoblastoma

Children with hepatoblastoma should have their treatment planned by a team of healthcare providers who are experts in treating this rare childhood cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a pediatric oncologist, a doctor who specializes in treating children with cancer. The pediatric oncologist works with other healthcare providers who are experts in treating children with hepatoblastoma and who specialize in certain areas of medicine. It is especially important to have a pediatric surgeon with experience in liver surgery who can send patients to a liver transplant program if needed. Other specialists may include the following:

  • pediatrician
  • radiation oncologist
  • pediatric nurse specialist
  • rehabilitation specialist
  • psychologist
  • social worker
  • nutritionist

For more information about having a child with cancer and ways to cope and find support, see Childhood Cancers.

Every child will not receive all the treatments listed below. Your child’s care team will help you make treatment decisions based on your child’s unique situation. To learn more about factors that help determine the treatment plan for hepatoblastoma, see Prognostic factors for hepatoblastoma.

Surgery

When possible, the cancer is removed by surgery. The types of surgery that may be done are:

  • Partial hepatectomy: The part of the liver where cancer is found is removed by surgery. The part removed may be a wedge of tissue, an entire lobe, or a larger part of the liver, along with a small amount of normal tissue around it.
  • Total hepatectomy and liver transplant: The entire liver is removed by surgery, followed by a transplant of a healthy liver from a donor. A liver transplant may be possible when cancer has not spread beyond the liver and a donated liver can be found. If the patient has to wait for a donated liver, other treatment is given as needed.
  • Resection of metastases: Surgery is done to remove cancer that has spread outside of the liver, such as to nearby tissues, the lungs, or the brain.

The type of surgery that can be done depends on the following:

  • the PRETEXT group and POSTTEXT group
  • the size of the primary tumor
  • whether there is more than one tumor in the liver
  • whether the cancer has spread to nearby large blood vessels
  • the level of AFP in the blood
  • whether the tumor can be shrunk by chemotherapy so that it can be removed by surgery
  • whether a liver transplant is needed

Chemotherapy is sometimes given before surgery to shrink the tumor and make it easier to remove. This is called neoadjuvant therapy.

After the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after the surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Watchful waiting

Watchful waiting is closely monitoring a patient’s condition without giving any treatment until signs or symptoms appear or change. In hepatoblastoma, this treatment is only used for small tumors that have been completely removed by surgery.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). Treatment using more than one anticancer drug is called combination chemotherapy.

Chemoembolization of the hepatic artery (the main artery that supplies blood to the liver) is a type of regional chemotherapy used to treat childhood liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. The anticancer drug is injected into the hepatic artery through a catheter (thin tube). The drug is mixed with a substance that blocks the artery, cutting off blood flow to the tumor. Most of the anticancer drug is trapped near the tumor and only a small amount of the drug reaches other parts of the body. The blockage may be temporary or permanent, depending on the substance used to block the artery. The tumor is prevented from getting the oxygen and nutrients it needs to grow. The liver continues to receive blood from the hepatic portal vein, which carries blood from the stomach and intestine to the liver. This procedure is also called transarterial chemoembolization or TACE.

The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type of the cancer being treated and the PRETEXT or POSTTEXT group.

To learn more about chemotherapy and its side effects, see Chemotherapy and You: Support for People with Cancer.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type of the cancer being treated and the PRETEXT or POSTTEXT group.

There are two types of radiation therapy:

  • External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the area of the body with cancer. External radiation therapy is used to treat hepatoblastoma that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body.
  • Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer.

    Radioembolization is a type of internal radiation therapy used to treat hepatoblastoma. A very small amount of a radioactive substance is attached to tiny beads that are injected into the hepatic artery (the main artery that supplies blood to the liver) through a thin tube called a catheter. The beads are mixed with a substance that blocks the artery, cutting off blood flow to the tumor. Most of the radiation is trapped near the tumor to kill the cancer cells. This is done to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life for children with hepatoblastoma.

To learn more about radiation therapy and its side effects, see Radiation Therapy to Treat Cancer and Radiation Therapy Side Effects.

Ablation therapy

Ablation therapy removes or destroys tissue. Different types of ablation therapy are used for liver cancer:

  • Radiofrequency ablation: Special needles are inserted directly through the skin or through an incision in the abdomen to reach the tumor. High-energy radio waves heat the needles and tumor which kills cancer cells. Radiofrequency ablation is being used to treat recurrent hepatoblastoma.
  • Percutaneous ethanol injection: A small needle is used to inject ethanol (pure alcohol) directly into a tumor to kill cancer cells. Treatment may require several injections. Percutaneous ethanol injection is being used to treat recurrent hepatoblastoma.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells. Targeted therapies usually cause less harm to normal cells than chemotherapy or radiation therapy do. Targeted therapy is being studied for the treatment of hepatoblastoma that has come back after treatment.

To learn more about how targeted therapy works against cancer, what to expect when having targeted therapy, and targeted therapy side effects, see Targeted Therapy to Treat Cancer.

Clinical trials

A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. For some patients, taking part in a clinical trial may be the best treatment choice.

Use our clinical trial search to find NCI-supported cancer clinical trials that are accepting patients. You can search for trials based on the type of cancer, the age of the patient, and where the trials are being done. Clinical trials supported by other organizations can be found on the ClinicalTrials.gov website.

To learn more about clinical trials, see Clinical Trials Information for Patients and Caregivers.

Long-term side effects of treatment

Side effects from cancer treatment that begin after treatment and continue for months or years are called long-term or late effects. Late effects of cancer treatment may include the following:

  • physical problems
  • changes in mood, feelings, thinking, learning, or memory
  • second cancers (new types of cancer)

Some late effects may be treated or controlled. It is important to talk with your child's doctors about the long-term effects cancer treatment can have on your child. For more information, see Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer.

Follow-up tests

Some of the tests that were done to diagnose the cancer or to find out the treatment group may be repeated. Some tests will be repeated to see how well the treatment is working. Decisions about whether to continue, change, or stop treatment may be based on the results of these tests.

Some of the tests will continue to be done from time to time after treatment has ended. The results of these tests can show if your condition has changed or if the cancer has recurred (come back). These tests are sometimes called follow-up tests or check-ups. 

childhood hepatoblastoma

Treatment of newly diagnosed hepatoblastoma

Treatment options for newly diagnosed hepatoblastoma that can be removed by surgery at the time of diagnosis may include the following:

  • surgery to remove the tumor, followed by combination chemotherapy for hepatoblastoma that is not well-differentiated fetal histology or aggressive chemotherapy for small cell undifferentiated histology
  • surgery to remove the tumor, followed by watchful waiting or chemotherapy, for hepatoblastoma with well-differentiated fetal histology

Treatment options for newly diagnosed hepatoblastoma that cannot be removed by surgery or is not removed at the time of diagnosis may include the following:

  • combination chemotherapy to shrink the tumor, followed by surgery to remove the tumor
  • combination chemotherapy, followed by a liver transplant
  • chemoembolization of the hepatic artery to shrink the tumor, followed by surgery to remove the tumor
  • if the tumor in the liver cannot be removed by surgery but there are no signs of cancer in other parts of the body, the treatment may be a liver transplant

For newly diagnosed hepatoblastoma that has spread to other parts of the body at the time of diagnosis, combination chemotherapy is given to shrink the tumors in the liver and cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. After chemotherapy, imaging tests are done to check whether the tumors can be removed by surgery.

Treatment options may include the following:

  • If the tumor in the liver and other parts of the body (usually nodules in the lung) can be removed, surgery will be done to remove the tumors followed by chemotherapy to kill any cancer cells that may remain.
  • If the tumor in other parts of the body cannot be removed or a liver transplant is not possible, chemotherapy, chemoembolization of the hepatic artery, or radiation therapy may be given.
  • If the tumor in other parts of the body cannot be removed or the patient does not want surgery, radiofrequency ablation may be given.

Treatment options in clinical trials for newly diagnosed hepatoblastoma include the following:

  • a clinical trial of chemotherapy and surgery
childhood hepatoblastoma

Treatment of progressive or recurrent hepatoblastoma

Treatment of progressive or recurrent hepatoblastoma may include the following:

  • surgery to remove isolated (single and separate) metastatic tumors with or without chemotherapy
  • radiofrequency ablation
  • combination chemotherapy
  • liver transplant
  • ablation therapy (radiofrequency ablation or percutaneous ethanol injection) as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life
  • a clinical trial that checks a sample of the patient's tumor for certain gene changes to determine the type of targeted therapy that will be given to the patient

Carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

El carcinoma hepatocelular en niños es un tipo de cáncer raro que se forma en las células del hígado llamadas hepatocitos. Los hepatocitos son las células del hígado más comunes y las que desempeñan la mayoría de las funciones de este órgano.

El hígado es uno de los órganos más grandes del cuerpo. Está detrás de las costillas, en la parte superior derecha del abdomen, y tiene dos lóbulos. El hígado tiene muchas funciones importantes y tres de ellas son las siguientes:

  • Producir la bilis para ayudar a digerir la grasa de los alimentos.
  • Almacenar glucógeno (azúcar), que el cuerpo usa para obtener energía.
  • Filtrar sustancias dañinas de la sangre para que salgan del cuerpo en las heces y la orina.

Anatomía del hígado; en la figura se muestran los lóbulos derecho e izquierdo del hígado. También se muestran los conductos biliares, la vesícula biliar, el estómago, el bazo, el páncreas, el intestino delgado y el colon.Anatomía del hígado. El hígado está en la parte superior del abdomen cerca del estómago, los intestinos, la vesícula biliar y el páncreas. El hígado tiene un lóbulo derecho y un lóbulo izquierdo. Cada lóbulo se divide en dos secciones (que no se muestran).

El carcinoma hepatocelular en niños suele afectar a niños mayores y a adolescentes. Es más común en lugares de Asia donde hay mayores tasas de infección por el virus de la hepatitis B que en los Estados Unidos. 

El carcinoma hepatocelular es el tipo más común de cáncer de hígado en adultos. Los factores de riesgo, la estadificación y el tratamiento de los niños son diferentes a los de los adultos. Para obtener información sobre el carcinoma hepatocelular en adultos, consulte ¿Qué es el cáncer de hígado?

Signos y síntomas del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

Los signos y síntomas son más comunes después de que el tumor se agranda. Otras afecciones pueden producir los mismos signos y síntomas. Consulte con el médico si su niño presenta alguno de los siguientes signos o síntomas:

  • Una masa en el abdomen que tal vez cause dolor.
  • Hinchazón en el abdomen.
  • Pérdida de peso por motivos desconocidos.
  • Pérdida del apetito.
  • Náuseas y vómitos.

Causas y factores de riesgo del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

Cualquier cosa que aumenta la probabilidad de tener una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. No todos los niños con uno o más de estos factores de riesgo tendrán carcinoma hepatocelular. Además, es posible que algunos niños sin factores de riesgo conocidos lo presenten. Consulte con el médico de su niño si piensa que está en riesgo.

Los siguientes síndromes o afecciones son factores de riesgo del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños:

Es posible que el carcinoma hepatocelular se presente en niños sin enfermedad del hígado preexistente.

Diagnóstico del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

Algunas pruebas que examinan el hígado y la sangre se usan para diagnosticar el carcinoma hepatocelular en niños y determinar si se diseminó. 

Es posible que se usen las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes de salud: se hace un examen físico para revisar el estado de salud de una persona e identificar signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se obtiene información sobre los hábitos de salud, los antecedentes de enfermedades y los tratamientos anteriores.
  • Prueba sérica de marcadores tumorales: este análisis de sangre mide las concentraciones de ciertas sustancias que los órganos, los tejidos o las células tumorales del cuerpo liberan en la sangre. Ciertas sustancias se relacionan con tipos específicos de cáncer cuando se encuentran en concentraciones más altas en la sangre. Estas sustancias se llaman marcadores tumorales. La sangre de los niños que tienen cáncer de hígado tal vez contenga cantidades altas de una hormona que se llama gonadotropina coriónica humana β (GCh-β), o una proteína que se llama alfafetoproteína (AFP). Es posible que otros tipos de cáncer, otros tumores hepáticos benignos y ciertas afecciones no cancerosas, como la cirrosis y la hepatitis también aumenten las concentraciones de AFP.
  • Recuento sanguíneo completo (RSC): procedimiento en el que se toma una muestra de sangre para verificar los siguientes elementos:
    • El número de glóbulos rojos, glóbulos blancos y plaquetas.
    • La cantidad de hemoglobina (la proteína que transporta el oxígeno) en los glóbulos rojos.
    • La parte de la muestra compuesta por glóbulos rojos.
  • Pruebas del funcionamiento hepático: estas pruebas de sangre miden la cantidad de ciertas sustancias que el hígado libera en la sangre. Una cantidad más alta que la normal de una sustancia, a veces, es un signo de daño hepático o cáncer de hígado.
  • Estudios bioquímicos de la sangre: estas pruebas de sangre miden la cantidad de ciertas sustancias, como la bilirrubina o la lactato–deshidrogenasa (LDH) que los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo liberan en la sangre. Una cantidad anormal (mayor o menor que la normal) de una sustancia quizás sea un signo de enfermedad.
  • Prueba del virus de Epstein-Barr (VEB): esta prueba de sangre verifica si hay anticuerpos del VEB y marcadores de ADN del VEB. Estos se encuentran en la sangre de los pacientes infectados por este virus.
  • Ensayo de hepatitis: esta prueba de sangre verifica si hay fragmentos (trozos) del virus de la hepatitis.
  • Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) con gadolinio: procedimiento en el que se usan un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas del interior del cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia que se llama gadolinio. El gadolinio se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas y las hace aparecer más brillantes en la imagen.

    Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) del abdomen; el dibujo muestra al niño en una camilla que se desliza hacia la máquina de IRM, la cual toma una radiografía de la parte interior del cuerpo. La almohadilla en el abdomen del niño ayuda a tomar imágenes más claras.Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) del abdomen. El niño se acuesta en una camilla que se desliza hacia la máquina de IRM, la cual toma radiografías de la parte interior del cuerpo. La almohadilla en el abdomen del niño ayuda a tomar imágenes más claras.

  • Tomografía computarizada (TC): procedimiento en el que se usa una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X para tomar una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo desde ángulos diferentes. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere para que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen de forma más clara. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computadorizada, tomografía axial computarizada (TAC) o exploración por TAC. En el caso del cáncer de hígado infantil, se suele hacer una TC del tórax (pecho) y del abdomen.

    Tomografía computarizada (TC) del abdomen; en la imagen se observa a un niño en una camilla que se desliza al escáner de TC, que toma imágenes radiográficas del interior del cuerpo.Tomografía computarizada (TC) del abdomen. El niño se acuesta en una camilla que se desliza al escáner de TC, que toma imágenes radiográficas del interior del cuerpo.

  • Ecografía: procedimiento en el que se hacen rebotar ondas de sonido de alta energía (ultrasonidos) en los tejidos u órganos internos para producir ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos del cuerpo que se llama ecograma. En el caso del cáncer de hígado infantil, se suele hacer una ecografía del abdomen para observar los vasos sanguíneos principales.

    Ecografía del abdomen; la imagen muestra al niño sobre una camilla durante un procedimiento de ecografía del abdomen. Se ve a un ecografista de diagnóstico (persona capacitada para realizar procedimientos de ecografía) pasando un transductor (instrumento que produce ondas de sonido que rebotan en los tejidos del interior del cuerpo) sobre la piel del abdomen. Una pantalla de computadora muestra un ecograma (imagen computarizada).Ecografía del abdomen. Se pasa un transductor conectado a una computadora sobre la piel del abdomen. El transductor ecográfico hace rebotar ondas de sonido en los órganos y tejidos internos para crear ecos que componen un ecograma (imagen computarizada).

  • Radiografía del abdomen: es posible tomar una radiografía de los órganos en el abdomen. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Biopsia: durante una biopsia, un médico extrae (saca) una muestra de células o tejidos. Después, un patólogo observa estas células o tejidos al microscopio para detectar células cancerosas y determinar el tipo de cáncer. Durante el mismo procedimiento de biopsia, a veces el médico extirpa una cantidad del tumor, siempre que sea posible y seguro.

    En la muestra de tejido que se extrae, a veces se hace la siguiente prueba:

    • Prueba inmunohistoquímica: en esta prueba de laboratorio, se usan anticuerpos para determinar si hay ciertos antígenos (marcadores) en una muestra de tejido de un paciente. Por lo general, los anticuerpos se unen a una enzima o un tinte fluorescente. Una vez que los anticuerpos se unen a un antígeno específico en una muestra de tejido, se activa la enzima o el tinte y se observa el antígeno al microscopio. Este tipo de prueba se usa para determinar la presencia de cierta mutación en un gen a fin de ayudar a diagnosticar el cáncer y diferenciarlo de otros tipos de cáncer.

Factores pronósticos del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

El pronóstico (probabilidad de recuperación) y las opciones de tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños dependen de los siguientes aspectos:

  • El grupo de PRETEXT.
  • Si el cáncer se diseminó a otros lugares del cuerpo, como los pulmones. 
  • Si el cáncer se puede extirpar por completo mediante cirugía.
  • La forma en que el cáncer reacciona a la quimioterapia.
  • Si el niño tiene una infección por el virus de la hepatitis B.
  • Si el cáncer recién se diagnosticó o recidivó (volvió). 

Para el carcinoma hepatocelular en niños que recidiva (vuelve) después del tratamiento inicial, el pronóstico y las opciones de tratamiento dependen de los siguientes aspectos:

  • Lugar del cuerpo donde el tumor recidivó.
  • Tipo de tratamiento que se usó para el cáncer inicial.

El cáncer de hígado infantil en ocasiones se cura si el tumor es pequeño y si se puede extirpar por completo mediante cirugía. La extirpación completa es posible más a menudo para el hepatoblastoma que para el carcinoma hepatocelular.

Estadios del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

Después del diagnóstico de carcinoma hepatocelular en niños, se hacen pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron en el hígado o a otras partes del cuerpo. El proceso que se usa para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó en el hígado, hacia el tejido u órganos cercanos o a otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. En el caso del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños, en lugar del estadio (etapa) se utilizan los grupos PRETEXT y POSTTEXT para planificar el tratamiento. Los resultados de las pruebas y procedimientos que se usan para detectar, diagnosticar y saber si el cáncer se diseminó son los que se usan para determinar los grupos PRETEXT y POSTTEXT.

Los dos sistemas de agrupamiento que se utilizan para decidir si el tumor se puede extirpar mediante cirugía en el carcinoma hepatocelular en niños son los siguientes:

  • El grupo PRETEXT: en este grupo se describe el tumor antes de que el paciente reciba cualquier tratamiento.
  • El grupo POSTTEXT: en este grupo se describe el tumor después de que el paciente reciba el tratamiento, como por ejemplo quimioterapia neoadyuvante.

El hígado se divide en cuatro secciones. Los grupos PRETEXT y POSTTEXT dependen de cuáles secciones del hígado presentan cáncer.

Grupo I de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT

Cáncer de hígado en el grupo I de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. En la imagen se observan 2 hígados. Las líneas punteadas dividen cada hígado en 4 secciones verticales de casi el mismo tamaño. En el primer hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la sección extrema izquierda. En el segundo hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la sección extrema derecha.Cáncer de hígado en el grupo I de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. El cáncer se encuentra en una sección del hígado y hay tres secciones contiguas que no tienen cáncer.

En el grupo I, el cáncer se encuentra en una sección del hígado. Tres secciones del hígado contiguas no tienen cáncer.

Grupo II de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT

Cáncer de hígado en el grupo II de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. En la imagen se observan 5 hígados. Las líneas punteadas dividen cada hígado en 4 secciones verticales de casi el mismo tamaño. En el primer hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en las 2 secciones de la izquierda. En el segundo hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en las 2 secciones de la derecha. En el tercer hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la sección extrema izquierda y en la sección extrema derecha. En el cuarto hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la segunda sección desde la izquierda. En el quinto hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la segunda sección desde la derecha.Cáncer de hígado en el grupo II de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. El cáncer se encuentra en 1 o 2 secciones del hígado, y hay 2 secciones contiguas que no tienen cáncer.

En el grupo II, el cáncer se encuentra en una o dos secciones del hígado. Dos secciones del hígado contiguas no tienen cáncer.

Grupo III de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT 

Cáncer de hígado en el grupo III de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. En la imagen se observan 7 hígados. Las líneas punteadas dividen cada hígado en 4 secciones verticales de casi el mismo tamaño. En el primer hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en 3 secciones de la izquierda. En el segundo hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en las 2 secciones de la izquierda y en la sección extrema derecha. En el tercer hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la sección extrema izquierda y en las 2 secciones de la derecha. En el cuarto hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en 3 secciones de la derecha. En el quinto hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en las 2 secciones del medio. En el sexto hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la sección extrema izquierda y en la segunda sección desde la derecha. En el séptimo hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en la sección extrema derecha y en la segunda sección desde la izquierda.Cáncer de hígado en el grupo III de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. Se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones: el cáncer se encuentra en 3 secciones del hígado y hay 1 sección que no tiene cáncer; o el cáncer se encuentra en 2 secciones del hígado y hay 2 secciones no contiguas sin cáncer.

En el grupo III, se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones:

  • El cáncer se encuentra en tres secciones del hígado y una sección no tiene cáncer.
  • El cáncer se encuentra en dos secciones del hígado y hay dos secciones no contiguas sin cáncer.

Grupo IV de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT

Cáncer de hígado en el grupo IV de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. En la imagen se observan 2 hígados. Las líneas punteadas dividen cada hígado en 4 secciones verticales de casi el mismo tamaño. En el primer hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en las 4 secciones. En el segundo hígado, el cáncer se encuentra en las 2 secciones de la izquierda y también se observan manchas de cáncer en las 2 secciones de la derecha.Cáncer de hígado en el grupo IV de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT. El cáncer se encuentra en las 4 secciones del hígado.

En el grupo IV, el cáncer se encuentra en las cuatro secciones del hígado. 

Algunas veces, el carcinoma hepatocelular en niños continúa creciendo o recidiva (vuelve) después del tratamiento. 

La enfermedad progresiva es un cáncer que sigue creciendo, diseminándose o empeorando. La enfermedad progresiva a veces es una señal de que el cáncer se volvió resistente al tratamiento.

El carcinoma hepatocelular en niños recidivante es cáncer que recidivó (volvió) después del tratamiento. El cáncer a veces reaparece en el hígado o en otras partes del cuerpo. Para obtener más información sobre el cáncer metastásico (cáncer que se diseminó desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo), consulte Cáncer metastásico.

Tipos de tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños

El tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular lo debe planificar un equipo de profesionales de la salud expertos en el tratamiento de este tipo de cáncer infantil raro. El tratamiento lo supervisará un oncólogo pediatra, un médico que se especializa en el tratamiento de niños con cáncer. El oncólogo pediatra trabaja con otros proveedores de atención de la salud expertos en el tratamiento de niños con carcinoma hepatocelular y que se especializan en ciertos campos de la medicina. Es de especial importancia, contar con un cirujano pediatra con experiencia en cirugía del hígado, quien pueda remitir a los pacientes a un programa de trasplante de hígado, de ser necesario. Otros especialistas pueden ser los siguientes:

  • Pediatra.
  • Radioncólogo.
  • Enfermero especializado en pediatría.
  • Especialista en rehabilitación.
  • Psicólogo.
  • Trabajador social.
  • Nutricionista.

Para obtener más información sobre el cáncer en los niños y cómo hacer frente a la situación y encontrar ayuda, consulte Cánceres infantiles.

No todos los niños tendrán que hacerse cada uno de los tratamientos que se describen a continuación. El equipo de atención de la salud le ayudará a tomar las decisiones relacionadas con el tratamiento según la situación particular de su niño. Para obtener más información sobre los factores que ayudan a determinar el plan de tratamiento para el carcinoma hepatocelular en niños, consulte Factores pronósticos del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños.

Cirugía 

Cuando es posible, el cáncer se extirpa mediante cirugía. Los tipos de cirugía que tal vez se hagan son los siguientes:

  • Hepatectomía parcial: se extirpa mediante cirugía el trozo de hígado donde se encontró cáncer. Es posible que este trozo sea un tejido en forma de cuña, un lóbulo completo o una parte más grande del hígado y un poco del tejido sano que lo rodea.
  • Hepatectomía total y trasplante de hígado: se extirpa todo el hígado mediante cirugía y se reemplaza con uno sano de un donante. Este procedimiento es posible cuando el cáncer solo está en el hígado y se obtiene un hígado donado. Si el paciente debe esperar por el hígado de un donante, se usa otro tratamiento según sea necesario. 
  • Resección de metástasis: cirugía para extirpar cáncer que se diseminó fuera del hígado, como a los tejidos cercanos, los pulmones o el encéfalo.

El tipo de cirugía que se hace depende de las siguientes características:

  • El grupo de PRETEXT y POSTTEXT.
  • Tamaño del tumor primario.
  • Si hay más de un tumor en el hígado.
  • Si el cáncer se diseminó a los vasos sanguíneos principales cercanos.
  • La concentración de alfafetoproteína (AFP) en la sangre.
  • Si es posible reducir el tamaño del tumor con quimioterapia para que se pueda extirpar mediante cirugía.
  • Si es necesario un trasplante de hígado.

Algunas veces, se administra quimioterapia antes de una cirugía para disminuir el tamaño del tumor y facilitar su extirpación. Esto se llama terapia neoadyuvante.

Una vez que el médico extirpa todo el cáncer visible durante la cirugía, es posible que algunos pacientes reciban quimioterapia o radioterapia después de la cirugía para destruir cualquier célula cancerosa que haya quedado. El tratamiento que se administra después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento del cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir la formación de células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o al impedir su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por boca o se inyecta en una vena o un músculo, los medicamentos ingresan al torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal, como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan sobre todo las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). Cuando en un tratamiento se usa más de un medicamento contra el cáncer, se le llama quimioterapia combinada.

La quimioembolización de la arteria hepática (la arteria principal que transporta sangre al hígado) es un tipo de quimioterapia regional que se utiliza para tratar el cáncer de hígado infantil que no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía. El medicamento contra el cáncer se inyecta en la arteria hepática a través de un catéter (tubo delgado). El medicamento se combina con una sustancia que obstruye la arteria e interrumpe el flujo de sangre hacia el tumor. La mayoría del medicamento contra el cáncer queda retenida cerca del tumor y solo una cantidad pequeña llega a otras partes del cuerpo. La obstrucción puede ser temporal o permanente, según la sustancia que se utilice para bloquear la arteria. Esto evita que el tumor reciba el oxígeno y los nutrientes que necesita para crecer. El hígado continúa recibiendo sangre de la vena porta, que transporta la sangre desde el estómago y el intestino hasta el hígado. Este procedimiento también se llama quimioembolización transarterial o QETA.

La forma en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo de cáncer que se esté tratando y del grupo de PRETEXT o POSTTEXT.

Para obtener más información sobre la quimioterapia y sus efectos secundarios, consulte La quimioterapia y usted: Apoyo para las personas con cáncer.

Radioterapia 

La radioterapia es un tratamiento del cáncer en el que se usan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que se multipliquen. En la radioterapia interna, se usa una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente en el cáncer o cerca de este.

  • La radioembolización es un tipo de radioterapia interna que se usa para tratar el carcinoma hepatocelular. Una pequeña cantidad de una sustancia radiactiva se adhiere a perlas pequeñas que se inyectan en la arteria hepática (la arteria principal que transporta sangre al hígado) mediante un tubo delgado llamado catéter. Las perlas se combinan con una sustancia que obstruye la arteria e interrumpe el flujo de sangre hacia el tumor. La mayoría de la radiación queda retenida cerca del tumor para eliminar las células cancerosas. Esto se hace para aliviar los síntomas y mejorar la calidad de vida de los niños con carcinoma hepatocelular.

Para obtener más información sobre la radioterapia y sus efectos secundarios, consulte Radioterapia para tratar el cáncer y Efectos secundarios de la radioterapia.

Tratamiento antivírico

El carcinoma hepatocelular que se relaciona con el virus de la hepatitis B a veces se trata con medicamentos antivíricos.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento en el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas. Por lo general, las terapias dirigidas causan menos daño a las células normales que la quimioterapia o la radioterapia. Las terapias dirigidas están en estudio para el tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular que volvió después del tratamiento. 

Para obtener más información sobre la forma en que la terapia dirigida actúa en el tratamiento del cáncer, lo que se espera que pase cuando un paciente recibe terapia dirigida y los efectos secundarios de la terapia dirigida, consulte Terapia dirigida para tratar el cáncer.

Ensayos clínicos

Un ensayo clínico de tratamiento es un estudio de investigación. Estos se hacen con el fin de mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para los pacientes de cáncer. La mejor opción de tratamiento para algunos pacientes es participar en un ensayo clínico.

Use el buscador de ensayos clínicos en inglés para encontrar los ensayos clínicos que el NCI patrocina y que aceptan pacientes en este momento. La información en inglés sobre ensayos clínicos patrocinados por otras organizaciones, se encuentra en el portal de Internet ClinicalTrials.gov.

Para obtener más información sobre ensayos clínicos, consulte la página Información sobre estudios clínicos para pacientes y cuidadores.

Efectos secundarios a largo plazo del tratamiento

Los efectos secundarios del tratamiento de cáncer que empiezan después de este y continúan durante meses o años se llaman efectos tardíos o a largo plazo. Los efectos tardíos del tratamiento del cáncer a veces incluyen los siguientes:

  • Problemas físicos.
  • Cambios en el estado de ánimo, los sentimientos, el pensamiento, el aprendizaje o la memoria.
  • Segundos cánceres (nuevos tipos de cáncer).

Es posible tratar o controlar algunos efectos tardíos. Es importante hablar con los médicos sobre los posibles efectos a largo plazo de algunos tratamientos del cáncer en su niño. Para obtener más información, consulte Efectos tardíos del tratamiento anticanceroso en la niñez.

Pruebas de seguimiento

Es posible que se repitan algunas de las pruebas que se usaron para diagnosticar el cáncer o para determinar el grupo de tratamiento. Algunas de las pruebas se repiten para saber si el tratamiento está funcionando. Los resultados de estas pruebas sirven para tomar decisiones sobre el tratamiento: continuarlo, interrumpirlo o cambiarlo.

Algunas de las pruebas se seguirán haciendo de vez en cuando después de terminar el tratamiento. Los resultados de estas pruebas quizás indiquen si la afección del niño ha cambiado o si el cáncer recidivó (volvió). Estas pruebas también se llaman exámenes de seguimiento, revisión o control.

childhood hepatocellular carcinoma

Tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños de diagnóstico reciente

El tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular de diagnóstico reciente que se puede extirpar mediante cirugía en el momento del diagnóstico incluye las siguientes opciones:

  • Cirugía sola para extirpar el tumor.
  • Cirugía para extirpar el tumor, seguida de quimioterapia con cisplatino y doxorrubicina.
  • Quimioterapia combinada seguida de cirugía para extirpar el tumor.

El tratamiento para un carcinoma hepatocelular recién diagnosticado que no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía y que no se diseminó a otras partes del cuerpo en el momento del diagnóstico incluye las siguientes opciones:

  • Quimioterapia para reducir el tamaño del tumor, seguida de cirugía para extirparlo por completo.
  • Quimioterapia para reducir el tamaño del tumor. 

Si el tumor no se puede extirpar por completo mediante cirugía, el tratamiento adicional incluye los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Trasplante de hígado.
  • Quimioembolización de la arteria hepática para reducir el tamaño del tumor, seguida de cirugía para extirpar el tumor o trasplante de hígado.
  • Quimioembolización de la arteria hepática sola.
  • Quimioembolización seguida de trasplante de hígado.
  • Radioembolización de la arteria hepática como terapia paliativa para aliviar los síntomas y mejorar la calidad de vida.

El tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular recién diagnosticado que se diseminó a otras partes del cuerpo en el momento del diagnóstico incluye el siguiente procedimiento:

  • Quimioterapia combinada para reducir el tamaño del tumor, seguida de cirugía para extirpar tanto tumor como sea posible del hígado y otras partes adonde el cáncer se diseminó. En los estudios no se observó que este tratamiento sea eficaz, pero es posible que beneficie a algunos pacientes.

El tratamiento de un carcinoma hepatocelular recién diagnosticado relacionado con la infección por el virus de la hepatitis B (VHB) incluye las siguientes opciones:

  • Cirugía para extirpar el tumor.
  • Medicamentos antivíricos para tratar la infección producida por el virus de la hepatitis B.

El tratamiento en ensayos clínicos para un carcinoma hepatocelular recién diagnosticado incluye la siguiente opción:

  • Participación en un ensayo clínico de quimioterapia y cirugía.
childhood hepatocellular carcinoma

Tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular en niños progresivo o recidivante

El tratamiento del carcinoma hepatocelular progresivo o recidivante incluye las siguientes opciones:

  • Quimioembolización de la arteria hepática para reducir el tamaño del tumor antes del trasplante de hígado.
  • Trasplante de hígado.
  • Participación en un ensayo clínico de terapia dirigida (sorafenib o pazopanib).
  • Participación en un ensayo clínico en el que se examine una muestra del tumor del paciente para verificar si tiene ciertos cambios en los genes y determinar el tipo de terapia dirigida que se administrará.

Sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños

El sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños (sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado hepático en niños) es un tipo de cáncer raro que se forma en los tejidos del hígado. Este tipo de cáncer de hígado se suele presentar en niños de 5 a 10 años. Con frecuencia, se disemina por todo el hígado o a los pulmones.

El hígado es uno de los órganos más grandes del cuerpo. Está detrás de las costillas, en la parte superior derecha del abdomen, y tiene dos lóbulos. El hígado tiene muchas funciones importantes y tres de ellas son las siguientes:

  • Producir la bilis para ayudar a digerir la grasa de los alimentos.
  • Almacenar glucógeno (azúcar), que el cuerpo usa para obtener energía.
  • Filtrar sustancias dañinas de la sangre para que salgan del cuerpo en las heces y la orina.

Anatomía del hígado; en la figura se muestran los lóbulos derecho e izquierdo del hígado. También se muestran los conductos biliares, la vesícula biliar, el estómago, el bazo, el páncreas, el intestino delgado y el colon.Anatomía del hígado. El hígado está en la parte superior del abdomen cerca del estómago, los intestinos, la vesícula biliar y el páncreas. El hígado tiene un lóbulo derecho y un lóbulo izquierdo. Cada lóbulo se divide en dos secciones (que no se muestran).

Signos y síntomas del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños

Los signos y síntomas son más comunes después de que el tumor se agranda. Es posible que el sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños y otras afecciones causen estos signos o síntomas. Consulte con el médico si su niño presenta alguno de los siguientes signos o síntomas:

  • Una masa en el abdomen que tal vez cause dolor.
  • Hinchazón en el abdomen.

Diagnóstico del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños

Para diagnosticar el sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños y determinar si el cáncer se diseminó, se utilizan pruebas que examinan el hígado y la sangre.

Es posible que se usen las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes de salud: se hace un examen físico para revisar el estado de salud de una persona e identificar signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se obtiene información sobre los hábitos de salud y los antecedentes de enfermedades y tratamientos.
  • Recuento sanguíneo completo (RSC): procedimiento en el que se toma una muestra de sangre para verificar los siguientes elementos:
    • El número de glóbulos rojos, glóbulos blancos y plaquetas.
    • La cantidad de hemoglobina (la proteína que transporta el oxígeno) en los glóbulos rojos.
    • La parte de la muestra compuesta por glóbulos rojos.
  • Pruebas del funcionamiento hepático: estas pruebas de sangre miden la cantidad de ciertas sustancias que el hígado libera en la sangre. Una cantidad más alta que la normal de una sustancia, a veces, es un signo de daño hepático o cáncer de hígado.
  • Estudios bioquímicos de la sangre: estas pruebas de sangre miden la cantidad de ciertas sustancias, como la bilirrubina o la lactato–deshidrogenasa (LDH) que los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo liberan en la sangre. Una cantidad anormal (mayor o menor que la normal) de una sustancia quizás sea un signo de enfermedad.
  • Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) con gadolinio: procedimiento en el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas del interior del hígado. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia que se llama gadolinio. El gadolinio se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas y las hace aparecer más brillantes en la imagen.

    Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) del abdomen; el dibujo muestra al niño en una camilla que se desliza hacia la máquina de IRM, la cual toma una radiografía de la parte interior del cuerpo. La almohadilla en el abdomen del niño ayuda a tomar imágenes más claras.Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) del abdomen. El niño se acuesta en una camilla que se desliza hacia la máquina de IRM, la cual toma radiografías de la parte interior del cuerpo. La almohadilla en el abdomen del niño ayuda a tomar imágenes más claras.

  • Tomografía computarizada (TC): procedimiento en el que se usa una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X para tomar una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo desde ángulos diferentes. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere para que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen de forma más clara. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computadorizada, tomografía axial computarizada (TAC) o exploración por TAC. En el caso del cáncer de hígado infantil, se suele hacer una TC del tórax (pecho) y del abdomen.

    Tomografía computarizada (TC) del abdomen; en la imagen se observa a un niño en una camilla que se desliza al escáner de TC, que toma imágenes radiográficas del interior del cuerpo.Tomografía computarizada (TC) del abdomen. El niño se acuesta en una camilla que se desliza al escáner de TC, que toma imágenes radiográficas del interior del cuerpo.

  • Ecografía: procedimiento en el que se hacen rebotar ondas de sonido de alta energía (ultrasonidos) en los tejidos u órganos internos para producir ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos del cuerpo que se llama ecograma. En el caso del cáncer de hígado infantil, se suele hacer una ecografía del abdomen para observar los vasos sanguíneos principales.

    Ecografía del abdomen; la imagen muestra al niño sobre una camilla durante un procedimiento de ecografía del abdomen. Se ve a un ecografista de diagnóstico (persona capacitada para realizar procedimientos de ecografía) pasando un transductor (instrumento que produce ondas de sonido que rebotan en los tejidos del interior del cuerpo) sobre la piel del abdomen. Una pantalla de computadora muestra un ecograma (imagen computarizada).Ecografía del abdomen. Se pasa un transductor conectado a una computadora sobre la piel del abdomen. El transductor ecográfico hace rebotar ondas de sonido en los órganos y tejidos internos para crear ecos que componen un ecograma (imagen computarizada).

  • Radiografía del abdomen: es posible tomar una radiografía de los órganos en el abdomen. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Biopsia: durante una biopsia, un médico extrae (saca) una muestra de células o tejidos. Después, un patólogo observa estas células o tejidos al microscopio para detectar células cancerosas y determinar el tipo de cáncer. Durante el mismo procedimiento de biopsia, a veces el médico extirpa una cantidad del tumor, siempre que sea posible y seguro.

    En la muestra de tejido que se extrae, a veces se hace la siguiente prueba:

    • Prueba inmunohistoquímica: en esta prueba de laboratorio, se usan anticuerpos para determinar si hay ciertos antígenos (marcadores) en una muestra de tejido de un paciente. Por lo general, los anticuerpos se unen a una enzima o un tinte fluorescente. Una vez que los anticuerpos se unen a un antígeno específico en una muestra de tejido, se activa la enzima o el tinte y se observa el antígeno al microscopio. Este tipo de prueba se usa para determinar la presencia de cierta mutación en un gen a fin de ayudar a diagnosticar el cáncer y diferenciarlo de otros tipos de cáncer.

Factores pronósticos del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños

El pronóstico (probabilidad de recuperación) y las opciones de tratamiento dependen de los siguientes aspectos:

  • El tamaño del tumor.
  • El estado de salud del paciente.
  • La forma en que el cáncer reacciona a la quimioterapia.
  • Si el cáncer se puede extirpar por completo mediante cirugía.
  • Si el paciente puede recibir un trasplante de hígado.
  • Si el cáncer recién se diagnosticó o recidivó (volvió).

Para el sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños que recidiva (vuelve) después del tratamiento inicial, el pronóstico y las opciones de tratamiento dependen de los siguientes aspectos:

  • Lugar del cuerpo donde el tumor recidivó.
  • Tipo de tratamiento que se usó para el cáncer inicial.

Tipos de tratamiento para el sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños

El tratamiento del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado lo debe planificar un equipo de profesionales de la salud expertos en el tratamiento de este tipo de cáncer infantil raro. El tratamiento lo supervisará un oncólogo pediatra, un médico que se especializa en el tratamiento de niños con cáncer. El oncólogo pediatra trabaja con otros proveedores de atención de la salud expertos en el tratamiento de niños con sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado y que se especializan en ciertos campos de la medicina. Es de especial importancia contar con un cirujano pediatra con experiencia en cirugía del hígado, quien pueda remitir a los pacientes a un programa de trasplante de hígado, de ser necesario. Otros especialistas pueden ser los siguientes:

  • Pediatra.
  • Radioncólogo.
  • Enfermero especializado en pediatría.
  • Especialista en rehabilitación.
  • Psicólogo.
  • Trabajador social.
  • Nutricionista.

Para obtener más información sobre el cáncer en los niños y cómo hacer frente a la situación y encontrar ayuda, consulte Cánceres infantiles.

No todos los niños tendrán que hacerse cada uno de los tratamientos que se describen a continuación. El equipo de atención de la salud le ayudará a tomar las decisiones relacionadas con el tratamiento según la situación particular de su niño. Para obtener más información sobre los factores que ayudan a determinar el plan de tratamiento para este cáncer, consulte Factores pronósticos del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños.

Cirugía

Es posible hacer una hepatectomía parcial (cirugía para extirpar la parte del hígado con cáncer). Se quita un trozo de tejido en forma de cuña, un lóbulo completo o una parte más grande del hígado y un poco del tejido sano que lo rodea. El tejido que queda del hígado se encarga de las funciones de este órgano y a veces vuelve a crecer.

Trasplante de hígado

En un trasplante, se extirpa todo el hígado y se reemplaza con uno sano de un donante. Este procedimiento es posible cuando la enfermedad solo está en el hígado y se obtiene un hígado donado. Si el paciente debe esperar por el hígado de un donante, se usa otro tratamiento según sea necesario.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento del cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir la formación de células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o al impedir su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por boca o se inyecta en una vena o un músculo, los medicamentos ingresan al torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando en un tratamiento se usa más de un medicamento contra el cáncer, se le llama quimioterapia combinada.

Para obtener más información sobre la quimioterapia y sus efectos secundarios, consulte La quimioterapia y usted: Apoyo para las personas con cáncer.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento en el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas. Por lo general, las terapias dirigidas causan menos daño a las células normales que la quimioterapia o la radioterapia. Las terapias dirigidas están en estudio para el tratamiento del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños que volvió después del tratamiento.

Para obtener más información sobre la forma en que la terapia dirigida actúa en el tratamiento del cáncer, lo que se espera que pase cuando un paciente recibe terapia dirigida y los efectos secundarios de la terapia dirigida, consulte Terapia dirigida para tratar el cáncer.

Ensayos clínicos

Un ensayo clínico de tratamiento es un estudio de investigación. Estos se hacen con el fin de mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para los pacientes de cáncer. La mejor opción de tratamiento para algunos pacientes es participar en un ensayo clínico.

Use el buscador de ensayos clínicos en inglés para encontrar los ensayos clínicos que el NCI patrocina y que aceptan pacientes en este momento. La información en inglés sobre ensayos clínicos patrocinados por otras organizaciones, se encuentra en el portal de Internet ClinicalTrials.gov.

Para obtener más información sobre ensayos clínicos, consulte la página Información sobre estudios clínicos para pacientes y cuidadores.

Efectos secundarios a largo plazo del tratamiento

Los efectos secundarios del tratamiento del cáncer que empiezan después de este y continúan durante meses o años se llaman efectos tardíos o a largo plazo. Los efectos tardíos del tratamiento del cáncer a veces incluyen los siguientes:

  • Problemas físicos.
  • Cambios en el estado de ánimo, los sentimientos, el pensamiento, el aprendizaje o la memoria.
  • Segundos cánceres (nuevos tipos de cáncer).

Es posible tratar o controlar algunos efectos tardíos. Es importante hablar con los médicos sobre los posibles efectos a largo plazo de algunos tratamientos del cáncer en su niño. Para obtener más información, consulte Efectos tardíos del tratamiento anticanceroso en la niñez.

Pruebas de seguimiento

Es posible que se repitan algunas de las pruebas que se usaron para diagnosticar el cáncer o para determinar el grupo de tratamiento. Algunas de las pruebas se repiten para saber si el tratamiento está funcionando. Los resultados de estas pruebas sirven para tomar decisiones sobre el tratamiento: continuarlo, interrumpirlo o cambiarlo.

Algunas de las pruebas se seguirán haciendo de vez en cuando después de terminar el tratamiento. Los resultados de estas pruebas quizás indiquen si la afección del niño ha cambiado o si el cáncer recidivó (volvió). Estas pruebas también se llaman exámenes de seguimiento, revisión o control.

Tratamiento del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños de diagnóstico reciente

El tratamiento del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños de diagnóstico reciente incluye las siguientes opciones:

  • Quimioterapia combinada para disminuir el tamaño del tumor, seguida de cirugía para extirpar tanto tumor como sea posible. También es posible administrar quimioterapia después de la cirugía para extirpar el tumor.
  • Se puede extirpar el tumor mediante cirugía, seguida de quimioterapia. A veces, se realiza una segunda cirugía para extirpar el tumor que quede, seguida de más quimioterapia.
  • Quizás se haga un trasplante de hígado si no se puede extirpar el tumor mediante cirugía.

Tratamiento del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños progresivo o recidivante

Algunas veces, el sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños continúa creciendo o recidiva (vuelve) después del tratamiento.

  • La enfermedad progresiva es un cáncer que sigue creciendo, diseminándose o empeorando. La enfermedad progresiva a veces es una señal de que el cáncer se volvió resistente al tratamiento.
  • El sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños recidivante es cáncer que recidivó (volvió) después del tratamiento. El cáncer a veces reaparece en el hígado o en otras partes del cuerpo.

Para obtener más información sobre el cáncer metastásico (cáncer que se diseminó desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo), consulte Cáncer metastásico.

El tratamiento del sarcoma embrionario indiferenciado de hígado en niños recidivante incluye la siguiente opción:

  • Participación en un ensayo clínico en el que se examine una muestra del tumor del paciente para verificar si tiene ciertos cambios en los genes y determinar el tipo de terapia dirigida que se administrará.

Coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes

El coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes (coriocarcinoma hepático infantil o coriocarcinoma hepático congénito) es un tipo de cáncer raro que se origina en la placenta y se disemina al bebé por nacer. Por lo general, el tumor se encuentra en los primeros pocos meses de vida.

El hígado es uno de los órganos más grandes del cuerpo. Está detrás de las costillas, en la parte superior derecha del abdomen, y tiene dos lóbulos. El hígado tiene muchas funciones importantes y tres de ellas son las siguientes:

  • Producir la bilis para ayudar a digerir la grasa de los alimentos.
  • Almacenar glucógeno (azúcar), que el cuerpo usa para obtener energía.
  • Filtrar sustancias dañinas de la sangre para que salgan del cuerpo en las heces y la orina.

Anatomía del hígado; en la figura se muestran los lóbulos derecho e izquierdo del hígado. También se muestran los conductos biliares, la vesícula biliar, el estómago, el bazo, el páncreas, el intestino delgado y el colon.Anatomía del hígado. El hígado está en la parte superior del abdomen cerca del estómago, los intestinos, la vesícula biliar y el páncreas. El hígado tiene un lóbulo derecho y un lóbulo izquierdo. Cada lóbulo se divide en dos secciones (que no se muestran).

La madre del niño también puede recibir un diagnóstico de coriocarcinoma. Para obtener más información sobre el tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de la madre del niño, consulte Tratamiento de la enfermedad trofoblástica de la gestación.

Signos y síntomas del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes

Los signos y síntomas son más comunes después de que el tumor se agranda. Es posible que el coriocarcinoma en lactantes y otras afecciones causen estos signos y síntomas. Consulte con el médico si su niño presenta alguno de los siguientes signos o síntomas:

  • Masa en el abdomen.
  • Hinchazón en el abdomen.
  • Hemorragia.

Diagnóstico del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes

Algunas pruebas que examinan el hígado y la sangre se usan para diagnosticar el coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes y determinar si se diseminó. Es posible que se usen las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes de salud: se hace un examen físico para revisar el estado de salud de una persona e identificar signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se obtiene información sobre los hábitos de salud, los antecedentes de enfermedades y los tratamientos anteriores.
  • Prueba sérica de marcadores tumorales: este análisis de sangre mide las concentraciones de ciertas sustancias que los órganos, los tejidos o las células tumorales del cuerpo liberan en la sangre. Ciertas sustancias se relacionan con tipos específicos de cáncer cuando se encuentran en concentraciones más altas en la sangre. Estas sustancias se llaman marcadores tumorales. La sangre de los niños que tienen cáncer de hígado tal vez contenga cantidades altas de una hormona que se llama gonadotropina coriónica humana β (GCh-β), o una proteína que se llama alfafetoproteína (AFP). Es posible que otros tipos de cáncer, otros tumores hepáticos benignos y ciertas afecciones no cancerosas, como la cirrosis y la hepatitis también aumenten las concentraciones de AFP.
  • Recuento sanguíneo completo (RSC): procedimiento en el que se toma una muestra de sangre para verificar los siguientes elementos:
    • El número de glóbulos rojos, glóbulos blancos y plaquetas.
    • La cantidad de hemoglobina (la proteína que transporta el oxígeno) en los glóbulos rojos.
    • La parte de la muestra compuesta por glóbulos rojos.
  • Pruebas del funcionamiento hepático: estas pruebas de sangre miden la cantidad de ciertas sustancias que el hígado libera en la sangre. Una cantidad más alta que la normal de una sustancia, a veces, es un signo de daño hepático o cáncer de hígado.
  • Estudios bioquímicos de la sangre: estas pruebas de sangre miden la cantidad de ciertas sustancias, como la bilirrubina o la lactato–deshidrogenasa (LDH) que los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo liberan en la sangre. Una cantidad anormal (mayor o menor que la normal) de una sustancia quizás sea un signo de enfermedad.
  • Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) con gadolinio: procedimiento en el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas del interior del hígado. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia que se llama gadolinio. El gadolinio se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas y las hace aparecer más brillantes en la imagen.

    Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) del abdomen; el dibujo muestra al niño en una camilla que se desliza hacia la máquina de IRM, la cual toma una radiografía de la parte interior del cuerpo. La almohadilla en el abdomen del niño ayuda a tomar imágenes más claras.Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) del abdomen. El niño se acuesta en una camilla que se desliza hacia la máquina de IRM, la cual toma radiografías de la parte interior del cuerpo. La almohadilla en el abdomen del niño ayuda a tomar imágenes más claras.

  • Tomografía computarizada (TC): procedimiento en el que se usa una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X para tomar una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo desde ángulos diferentes. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere para que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen de forma más clara. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computadorizada, tomografía axial computarizada (TAC) o exploración por TAC. En el caso del cáncer de hígado infantil, se suele hacer una TC del tórax (pecho) y del abdomen.

    Tomografía computarizada (TC) del abdomen; en la imagen se observa a un niño en una camilla que se desliza al escáner de TC, que toma imágenes radiográficas del interior del cuerpo.Tomografía computarizada (TC) del abdomen. El niño se acuesta en una camilla que se desliza al escáner de TC, que toma imágenes radiográficas del interior del cuerpo.

  • Ecografía: procedimiento en el que se hacen rebotar ondas de sonido de alta energía (ultrasonidos) en los tejidos u órganos internos para producir ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos del cuerpo que se llama ecograma. En el caso del cáncer de hígado infantil, se suele hacer una ecografía del abdomen para observar los vasos sanguíneos principales.

    Ecografía del abdomen; la imagen muestra al niño sobre una camilla durante un procedimiento de ecografía del abdomen. Se ve a un ecografista de diagnóstico (persona capacitada para realizar procedimientos de ecografía) pasando un transductor (instrumento que produce ondas de sonido que rebotan en los tejidos del interior del cuerpo) sobre la piel del abdomen. Una pantalla de computadora muestra un ecograma (imagen computarizada).Ecografía del abdomen. Se pasa un transductor conectado a una computadora sobre la piel del abdomen. El transductor ecográfico hace rebotar ondas de sonido en los órganos y tejidos internos para crear ecos que componen un ecograma (imagen computarizada).

  • Radiografía del abdomen: es posible tomar una radiografía de los órganos en el abdomen. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Biopsia: durante una biopsia, un médico extrae (saca) una muestra de células o tejidos. Después, un patólogo observa estas células o tejidos al microscopio para detectar células cancerosas y determinar el tipo de cáncer. Si se encuentran células cancerosas, el médico extraerá la mayor cantidad de tumor que sea posible de manera segura durante el mismo procedimiento de biopsia.

    En la muestra de tejido que se extrae, a veces se hace la siguiente prueba:

    • Prueba inmunohistoquímica: en esta prueba de laboratorio, se usan anticuerpos para determinar si hay ciertos antígenos (marcadores) en una muestra de tejido de un paciente. Por lo general, los anticuerpos se unen a una enzima o un tinte fluorescente. Una vez que los anticuerpos se unen a un antígeno específico en una muestra de tejido, se activa la enzima o el tinte y se observa el antígeno al microscopio. Este tipo de prueba se usa para determinar la presencia de cierta mutación en un gen a fin de ayudar a diagnosticar el cáncer y diferenciarlo de otros tipos de cáncer.

Factores pronósticos del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes

El pronóstico (probabilidad de recuperación) y las opciones de tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes dependen de los siguientes aspectos:

  • El tamaño del tumor.
  • El estado de salud del paciente.
  • La forma en que el cáncer reacciona a la quimioterapia.
  • Si el cáncer se puede extirpar por completo mediante cirugía.
  • Si el paciente puede recibir un trasplante de hígado.
  • Si el cáncer recién se diagnosticó o recidivó.

Para el coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes que recidiva (vuelve) después del tratamiento inicial, el pronóstico y las opciones de tratamiento dependen de los siguientes aspectos:

  • Lugar del cuerpo donde el tumor recidivó.
  • Tipo de tratamiento que se usó para el cáncer inicial.

Tipos de tratamiento para el coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes

El tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes lo debe planificar un equipo de profesionales de la salud expertos en el tratamiento de este tipo de cáncer infantil raro. El tratamiento lo supervisará un oncólogo pediatra, un médico que se especializa en el tratamiento de niños con cáncer. El oncólogo pediatra trabaja con otros proveedores de atención de la salud expertos en el tratamiento de niños con coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes y que se especializan en ciertos campos de la medicina. Es de especial importancia, contar con un cirujano pediatra con experiencia en cirugía del hígado, quien pueda remitir los pacientes a un programa de trasplante de hígado, de ser necesario. Otros especialistas pueden ser los siguientes:

  • Pediatra.
  • Radioncólogo.
  • Enfermero especializado en pediatría.
  • Especialista en rehabilitación.
  • Psicólogo.
  • Trabajador social.
  • Nutricionista.

Para obtener más información sobre el cáncer en los niños y cómo hacer frente a la situación y encontrar ayuda, consulte Cánceres infantiles.

No todos los niños tendrán que hacerse cada uno de los tratamientos que se describen a continuación. El equipo de atención de la salud le ayudará a tomar las decisiones relacionadas con el tratamiento según la situación particular de su niño. Para obtener más información sobre los factores que ayudan a determinar el plan de tratamiento para este cáncer, consulte Factores pronósticos del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes.

Cirugía

Es posible hacer una hepatectomía parcial (cirugía para extirpar la parte del hígado con cáncer). Se quita un trozo de tejido en forma de cuña, un lóbulo completo o una parte más grande del hígado y un poco del tejido sano que lo rodea. El tejido que queda del hígado se encarga de las funciones de este órgano y a veces vuelve a crecer.

Trasplante de hígado

En un trasplante, se extirpa todo el hígado y se reemplaza con uno sano de un donante. Este procedimiento es posible cuando la enfermedad solo está en el hígado y se obtiene un hígado donado. Si el paciente debe esperar por el hígado de un donante, se usa otro tratamiento según sea necesario.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento del cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir la formación de células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o al impedir su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por boca o se inyecta en una vena o un músculo, los medicamentos ingresan al torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando en un tratamiento se usa más de un medicamento contra el cáncer, se le llama quimioterapia combinada. Para obtener más información sobre la quimioterapia y sus efectos secundarios, consulte La quimioterapia y usted: Apoyo para las personas con cáncer.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento en el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas. Por lo general, las terapias dirigidas causan menos daño a las células normales que la quimioterapia o la radioterapia. Las terapias dirigidas están en estudio para el tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes que volvió después del tratamiento.

Para obtener más información sobre la forma en que la terapia dirigida actúa en el tratamiento del cáncer, lo que se espera que pase cuando un paciente recibe terapia dirigida y los efectos secundarios de la terapia dirigida, consulte Terapia dirigida para tratar el cáncer.

Ensayos clínicos

Un ensayo clínico de tratamiento es un estudio de investigación. Estos se hacen con el fin de mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para los pacientes de cáncer. La mejor opción de tratamiento para algunos pacientes es participar en un ensayo clínico.

Use el buscador de ensayos clínicos en inglés para encontrar los ensayos clínicos que el NCI patrocina y que aceptan pacientes en este momento. La información en inglés sobre ensayos clínicos patrocinados por otras organizaciones, se encuentra en el portal de Internet ClinicalTrials.gov.

Para obtener más información sobre ensayos clínicos, consulte la página Información sobre estudios clínicos para pacientes y cuidadores.

Efectos secundarios a largo plazo del tratamiento

Los efectos secundarios del tratamiento del cáncer que empiezan después de este y continúan durante meses o años se llaman efectos tardíos o a largo plazo. Los efectos tardíos del tratamiento del cáncer a veces incluyen los siguientes:

  • Problemas físicos.
  • Cambios en el estado de ánimo, los sentimientos, el pensamiento, el aprendizaje o la memoria.
  • Segundos cánceres (nuevos tipos de cáncer).

Es posible tratar o controlar algunos efectos tardíos. Es importante hablar con los médicos sobre los posibles efectos a largo plazo de algunos tratamientos del cáncer en su niño. Para obtener más información, consulte Efectos tardíos del tratamiento anticanceroso en la niñez.

Pruebas de seguimiento

Es posible que se repitan algunas de las pruebas que se usaron para diagnosticar el cáncer o para determinar el grupo de tratamiento. Algunas de las pruebas se repiten para saber si el tratamiento está funcionando. Los resultados de estas pruebas sirven para tomar decisiones sobre el tratamiento: continuarlo, interrumpirlo o cambiarlo.

Algunas de las pruebas se seguirán haciendo de vez en cuando después de terminar el tratamiento. Los resultados de estas pruebas quizás indiquen si la afección del niño ha cambiado o si el cáncer recidivó (volvió). Estas pruebas también se llaman exámenes de seguimiento, revisión o control.

Tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes de diagnóstico reciente

El tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes de diagnóstico reciente incluye las siguientes opciones:

  • Cirugía para extirpar el tumor.
  • Quimioterapia combinada para reducir el tamaño del tumor, seguida de cirugía para extirparlo.
  • Quimioterapia para tratar el tumor, seguida de trasplante de hígado.

Tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes progresivo o recidivante

Algunas veces, el coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes continúa creciendo o recidiva (vuelve) después del tratamiento.

  • La enfermedad progresiva es un cáncer que sigue creciendo, diseminándose o empeorando. La enfermedad progresiva a veces es una señal de que el cáncer se volvió resistente al tratamiento.
  • El coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes recidivante es cáncer que recidivó (volvió) después del tratamiento. El cáncer a veces reaparece en el hígado o en otras partes del cuerpo.

Para obtener más información sobre el cáncer metastásico (cáncer que se diseminó desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo), consulte Cáncer metastásico.

El tratamiento del coriocarcinoma de hígado en lactantes progresivo o recidivante incluye la siguiente opción:

  • Participación en un ensayo clínico en el que se examine una muestra del tumor del paciente para verificar si tiene ciertos cambios en los genes y determinar el tipo de terapia dirigida que se administrará.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
#
C
E
L
M
P
S
T