The Mozart Effect

James Metz, M.D.
Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania
Ultima Vez Modificado: 1 de noviembre del 2001

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Author: Don Campbell
Publisher: Avon Books
Price: $24.00 (USA) $31.00 (CAN)
ISBN: 0-380-97418-5
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Don Campbell is a classical musician, professional music critic in Japan, and educational director of the largest guild of children's choirs in the United States. He has written several books and produced numerous audiotapes on music and healing. He founded the Institute of Music, Health, and Education in 1988 in Boulder, Colorado. This book was written for the reader to "learn how music heals and how to integrate this powerful transformational medium into your daily life."

This book details how music can affect the listener physically, emotionally, and spiritually. It offers dramatic case histories on how music has helped in healing serious illnesses. The author also describes numerous situations where music is used at established medical institutions as an adjunct to medical therapies. He also explains how to use one's favorite music to gain the most in healing.

The author attempts to address various medical problems treated with music, including cancer. He presents case histories and small preliminary reports to support his opinions. Although this work is encouraging, it should be kept in mind that this therapy should be used in conjunction with standard medical treatments.

There is no doubt that music can soothe the cancer patient. It is used in various treatment scenarios and when combined with guided imagery, has had very successful results. The Mozart Effect addresses many of these issues. Music can be a very effective complementary therapy when patients are receiving standard medical treatments.


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