Metastatic Melanoma in Dogs

Ultima Vez Modificado: 4 de diciembre del 2003

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Question

Dear OncoLink "Ask The Experts,"
I have just learned that my 3-year-old chocolate lab has melanoma. I thought melanoma was skin cancer, however, hers is between her heart and her lung. I do not understand this. Thank you for any information you can provide. 

Answer

Lili Duda, VMD, Section Editor of the OncoLink Veterinary Oncology Menu, responds:

Melanomas in dogs fall into two categories: melanoma of the haired skin, which are usually (but not always) benign, and melanomas of the oral cavity and mucosa, which are very aggressive and highly malignant cancers that spread to draining lymph nodes, lungs, and other sites usually within a few months of diagnosis. There are no known predisposing causes of melanoma in dogs, but when cancer occurs at a young age, a genetic predisposition is sometimes a factor. Consultation with a board-certified veterinary oncologist is strongly recommended.

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News
ESMO: Combo Treatments Up Survival in Metastatic Melanoma

Sep 30, 2014 - For patients with untreated metastatic melanoma with BRAF V600 mutations, combination treatments of cobimetinib and vemurafenib, and dabrafenib and trametinib, improve progression-free survival. These findings were published online Sept. 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the European Society of Medical Oncology, held from Sept. 26 to 29 in Madrid.



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